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Bryan P. Keenan

Posts tagged "Chapter 13 Bankruptcy"

What is the role of the trustee in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

For Pittsburgh residents who are considered wage-earners and have property that they would like to retain but are in heavy debt with no viable alternatives to pay it, Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be a useful option to get back on stronger financial footing. There are many aspects of a Chapter 13 filing that should be gauged before moving forward with it. One that is not overtly problematic, but should be understood is the role of the Chapter 13 trustee. The trustee is integral to the success of the filing and cannot be ignored.

Understanding the difference between Chapter 13 and Chapter 7

If you've been living paycheck to paycheck for years, debt can accumulate quickly. It's far too easy for the average Pennsylvanian to reach a point where their level of debt is simply unsustainable. A single event, like a car accident or a medical issue, can make maintaining your payments impossible. Even those who have worked for years in the same field may find that cost of living increases simply aren't enough to cover their ever-expanding debt.

Nondischargeable debts after bankruptcy

As Pennsylvania residents may know, Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a way to reorganize debt and set up a repayment plan to pay creditors. Generally, at the end of the repayment, many remaining debts are discharged. However, some debts are not dischargeable. For instance, restitution in criminal cases or fines cannot be discharged. Debts associated with impaired driving and some forms of extended debt are not either.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy and walking away from a home

Individuals in Pennsylvania who are filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy may wonder what will happen if they find that they still cannot keep up their mortgage payments. Usually, people file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy when they make too much money to file for Chapter 7.

Differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13

As a Pennsylvania resident addresses financial difficulties, bankruptcy might be considered as a way of obtaining relief. Although bankruptcy can facilitate a fresh start in one's finances, the timing and type of relief can vary based on the type of bankruptcy filing selected. Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 both provide opportunities for excessive debt to be resolved, but the conditions and actions are different for each option.

Why filing for bankruptcy can be a wise move

While filing for bankruptcy might sound like a frightening thing to do, more than 1.2 million people in Pennsylvania and across the nation have sought federal protections, according to a recent report. Whenever people declare bankruptcy, they are usually trying to find a way out of uncontrollable or unmanageable debt.

Bankruptcy and debt relief options

When you are overwhelmed by debt in Pennsylvania, you may be searching for an option for debt relief. Many people find themselves in positions in which they need a fresh financial start. You might be behind on your mortgage payments, have ballooning credit card and medical debt or may owe the IRS taxes. Regardless, there are ways you can address the problems and take care of your financial problems.

An explanation Chapter 13 bankruptcy

When people in Pennsylvania have financial trouble and have exhausted all of their resources, they could be eligible for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The only people who are eligible for this type of bankruptcy filing are wage earners, sole proprietors and self-employed persons who earn an income regularly. Filers must have also submitted the tax forms required of them over the previous four years.

Understanding the Chapter 13 reorganization plan

Consumers in Pennsylvania may benefit from learning more about the steps, requirements and expectations involved with filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Debtors are required to submit their repayment plan within 14 days following the date that their petition is filed. The repayment plan and the periodic payment scheduled, usually monthly or weekly, must be approved by the court before it is recognized as legitimate.

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Bryan P. Keenan & Associates, P.C.

993 Greentree Road
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